Difference between revisions of "Pygmalion"

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(South African Performances)
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A play called ''[[Pygmalion]]'' was first produced in South Africa by [[Disney Roebuck]] in 18**. ??*
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1925: Shaw's play was first staged by the [[Macdona Players]] at [[His Majesty's Theatre]] on 25 May 1925.  The cast included [[George Wray]] (Professor Henry Higgins), [[Joan Hopegood]] (Eliza Doolittle), [[Stanley Drewitt]] (Colonel Pickering), [[A.S. Humewood]] (Alfred Doolittle), [[Mary Wray]] (Mrs. Pearce), [[Joan Blair]] (Mrs. Higgins), [[Naomi Rutherford]] (Mrs. Eynsford Hill).  The producer was [[Stanley Drewitt]].
  
 
1940: Shaw's text translated into [[Afrikaans]] by [[G. Uys]] with the title ''[[Koop my Blomme]]'' ("Buy my flowers"), it was done by [[Anton Ackermann]] with [[Pikkie Uys]] in the lead in 1940.  
 
1940: Shaw's text translated into [[Afrikaans]] by [[G. Uys]] with the title ''[[Koop my Blomme]]'' ("Buy my flowers"), it was done by [[Anton Ackermann]] with [[Pikkie Uys]] in the lead in 1940.  
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= Sources =
 
= Sources =
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Rand Daily Mail, 26 May, 1925
  
 
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pygmalion_(mythology)#Stage_plays
 
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pygmalion_(mythology)#Stage_plays

Revision as of 08:29, 19 October 2018

Pygmalion is Greek mythical character, about whom a number of dramatic works have been written.

Also written Pigmalion in some cases, notably from the French and Italian.

The character

Pygmalion is the Greek version of the Phoenician royal name Pumayyaton, and is most familiar from Ovid's narrative poem Metamorphoses, X, in which Pygmalion was a sculptor who fell in love with a statue he had carved.

Plays written about the character

There have been a number of theatrical works over the centuries based on the story of the Greek mythological figure Pygmalion. Many works used this title or use the name in the title of the work.

Among them are Jean-Philippe Rameau's opera Pigmalion (1748); Jean-Jacques Rousseau's Pygmalion (1762, staged 1770); Donizetti's first opera, Il Pigmalione (1816); William Brough's Pygmalion, or The Statue Fair (1867); W. S. Gilbert's Pygmalion and Galatea (1871), Marius Petipa and Nikita Trubetskoi's four act ballet Pygmalion, ou La Statue de Chypre(1883); George Bernard Shaw's Pygmalion (1912, staged 1914) and My Fair Lady (based on Shaw's play).

Plays by this name performed in South Africa

A number of the above works have been performed in South Africa, and they are discussed below.

Pygmalion by Jean-Jacques Rousseau (1762)

The play

A one-act scène lyrique (lyrical drama) by Jean-Jacques Rousseau, with music by Horace Coignet. Can be considered one of the first ever melodramas, in the original sense – i.e. a play consisting of pantomime gestures and the spoken word, both with a musical accompaniment. Written in 1762, It was first performed by amateurs at the Hôtel de Ville, Lyon in 1770, became part of the repertory of the Comédie-Française for about five years.

South African Performances

1803: Performed in French in the African Theatre by the Het Fransche Liefhebbery Geselschap, led by Charles Mathurin Villet, on 29 October 1803, with Le Directeur de la Comédie as afterpiece. In both pieces the lead role was taken by Mr Delémery, possibly a visiting professional actor.

1806: Performed in French in the African Theatre by the Het Fransche Liefhebbery Geselschap, led by Charles Mathurin Villet, on 31 May 1806, starring Mr Delémery again and Men Doet Wat Men Kan, Niet Wat Men Wil (Dorvigny, tr. Ogelwight). (Bosman appears to also mention an unnamed Lyrische Scene done by Delémery, but the problem is clearly his sentence structure - he is actually referring to Rousseau's work.)

1834: Performed in C.E. Boniface's Dutch translation in the African Theatre by Vlyt en Kunst December 1834, as afterpiece to De Burger Edelman (Molière).

18**: A play called Pygmalion was produced in South Africa by Disney Roebuck, possibly a version of this play. (??)*

Pygmalion and Galatea by W.S. Gilbert (1871)

Also found as Pygmalion & Galatea

The play

Called "an Original Mythological Comedy", it is a blank verse play in three acts, based on the Pygmalion story. It opened at the Haymarket Theatre in London on 9 December 1871 and ran for a very successful 184 performances

South African Performances

1876: Performed by Disney Roebuck and his company in the Athenaeum Hall, Cape Town, on 25 April, with Cool as a Cucumber (B. Jerrold).

1876: Performed by Disney Roebuck and his company in the Athenaeum Hall, Cape Town, on 9 June, with Brown and the Brahmins (Reece).

1878: Performed by the Disney Roebuck company in the Theatre Royal, Cape Town, on "Regatta Night", 22 May, with "scenes from Robinson Crusoe" (Defoe/ Byron) as a benefit for Miss Frances Delaval.

Pygmalion by G.B. Shaw (1912).

The play

The play by George Bernard Shaw tells the story of the poor flower seller who wants to be a lady, and is taught to "speak proper" by the professor Higgins. Written in 1912, it was first staged in 1914.

The play has had many spin-offs, including a fine film by Gabriel Pascal and, perhaps most famously, the stage and film musical My Fair Lady (Lerner and Loewe). (For South African stage performances see My Fair Lady)

South African Performances

1925: Shaw's play was first staged by the Macdona Players at His Majesty's Theatre on 25 May 1925. The cast included George Wray (Professor Henry Higgins), Joan Hopegood (Eliza Doolittle), Stanley Drewitt (Colonel Pickering), A.S. Humewood (Alfred Doolittle), Mary Wray (Mrs. Pearce), Joan Blair (Mrs. Higgins), Naomi Rutherford (Mrs. Eynsford Hill). The producer was Stanley Drewitt.

1940: Shaw's text translated into Afrikaans by G. Uys with the title Koop my Blomme ("Buy my flowers"), it was done by Anton Ackermann with Pikkie Uys in the lead in 1940.

1943: The play was the entry of the University Players for the 1943 F.A.T.S.A. Play Festival.

1946: Presented at Cape Town's Alhambra Theatre by the Munro-Inglis Company in collaboration with African Consolidated Theatres in October 1946, starring Nan Munro, Rayne Kruger, Henry Gilbert, Will Jamieson, Doreen Hamshaw, Jeannie Targowsky. Sets by Len Grossett.

1956: Presented by the University of Cape Town's Speech and Drama Department in April at the Little Theatre, directed by Gretel Mills.

1975: Directed by Peter Curtis for CAPAB opening 22 November with Lois Butlin as Eliza Doolittle and other cast members including Nicholas Ellenbogen, Mary Dreyer, Marion Achber, Dugald Thomson, Colin Duell, John Whiteley, Arthur Hall, Michael Atkinson, Joyce Bradley, Simon Swindell, Ann Courtneidge, Joanne Elkon. Set design by Ken Robinson, costume design by Jennifer Craig, lighting design by John T. Baker.

Sources

Rand Daily Mail, 26 May, 1925

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pygmalion_(mythology)#Stage_plays

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pygmalion_(Rousseau)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pygmalion_and_Galatea_(play)

Michael O'Dea. , 2016. Jean-Jacques Rousseau: Music, Illusion and Desire, Springer: p. 234.[1]

F.C.L. Bosman. 1928. Drama en Toneel in Suid-Afrika, Deel I: 1652-1855. Pretoria: J.H. de Bussy. [2]: pp. 88, 92, 330-331; 373

Trek, 8(7):20, 1943; 11(7):18, 1946.

Pygmalion theatre programme notes (CAPAB 1975).

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