Difference between revisions of "Villikins and his Dinah"

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''[[Villikins and his Dinah]]'' can refer to a popular stage song by an anonymous author, or to a burlesque play, using the song, by Francis C. Burnand.
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''[[Villikins and his Dinah]]'' can refer to a '''popular stage song''' by an anonymous author, or to a '''burlesque play''', using the song, by either '''J.  Stirling Coyne''' or '''Francis C. Burnand'''.
 +
 
 +
([[F.C.L. Bosman]] (1980) misspells the name as '''"Vilikins"''' in his history, though the error may have been made by his original sources.)
 +
 
 +
It is not always certain what form the performance took or which text was being used in a particular 19th century production. If it was not simply sung, Burnand's popular text often seems the most likely.  
  
 
=The stage song (1853)=  
 
=The stage song (1853)=  
Line 5: Line 9:
 
==The song==
 
==The song==
  
The song ''[[Villikins and his Dinah]]'' apparently emerged in England in 1853 as a burlesque version of a traditional ballad called "William and Dinah". Immensely popular, the tune was  later adopted for many other songs, including "Sweet Betsy from Pike" and two farces were written shortly after, to exploit the popularity of the stage song. ''[[Villikins and his Dinah]]'' (1855) by Francis C. Burnand and ''[[Willikind and hys Dinah]]'' (1854) by J. Stirling Coyne. 
+
The song ''[[Villikins and his Dinah]]'' apparently emerged in England in 1853 as a burlesque version of a traditional ballad called "William and Dinah". Immensely popular, the well-known tune was  later adopted for many other songs, including "Sweet Betsy from Pike".  
  
(To listen to a version of "''[[Villikins and his Dinah]]''" click on this link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WHjeDyv6Tzo )
+
(To listen to Kenneth McKellar's version of "''[[Villikins and his Dinah]]''" click on this link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WHjeDyv6Tzo )
  
 
== Performance history in South Africa ==
 
== Performance history in South Africa ==
  
The original stage song was apparently performed to acclaim by Private [[W. Dansie]] of the [[Ethiopian Serenaders]], in the [[Garrison Theatre]] of either Grahamstown or Keiskama Hoek, as part of an evening of entertainment by the [[North Lincolnshire Regiment of Foot]]. , on  May 27, 1861, and was repeated on the June 3.  
+
1860:  The Burnand burlesque version performed ("with songs") as afterpiece to ''[[A Hopeless Passion]]'' () by [[Charles Fraser]] and his company in the [[Cabinet Theatre]], Cape Town, on 26 January.
 +
 
 +
1860:  The Burnand burlesque version performed ("with songs") as afterpiece to ''[[Slasher and Crasher]]'' (Morton) by [[Charles Fraser]] and his company in the [[Cabinet Theatre]], Cape Town, on 26 January
 +
 
 +
1861: The original stage song was apparently performed to acclaim by Private [[W. Dansie]] of the [[Ethiopian Serenaders]], in the [[Garrison Theatre]] of either Grahamstown or Keiskama Hoek, as part of an evening of entertainment by the [[North Lincolnshire Regiment of Foot]]. , on  May 27, 1861, and was repeated on the June 3. ''(See the entry on the [[North Lincolnshire Regiment of Foot]] for contemporaneous commentary on the performance.)''
  
''(See the entry on the [[North Lincolnshire Regiment of Foot]] for contemporaneous commentary on the performance.)''
+
1869: Sung as a duet by Coock and Tanner (though it may possibly been a Performed version of Burnand's play), along with ''[[To Paris and Back for £5]]'' (Morton) by the [[Lanarkshire Dramatic Club]] (amateur players from the [[99th Regiment]]) in the [[Garrison Theatre]], Cape Town, on 17 June, part of the final performance and farewell by the Club.
  
 
==Sources==
 
==Sources==
Line 25: Line 33:
 
= The stage play by Coyne (1854)=
 
= The stage play by Coyne (1854)=
  
''[[Willikind and hys Dinah]]'' is described as "[a]n original pathetic and heart-rending tragedy. In three sad scenes" by J.  Stirling Coyne ()[].   
+
''[[Willikind and hys Dinah]]'' is described as "[a]n original pathetic and heart-rending tragedy. In three sad scenes" by J.  Stirling Coyne (1803-1868)[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joseph_Stirling_Coyne].   
  
 
==The original text==
 
==The original text==
Line 38: Line 46:
 
==Sources==
 
==Sources==
  
[https://www.worldcat.org/title/willikind-and-hys-dinah-an-original-pathetic-and-heart-rending-tragedy-in-three-sad-scenes/oclc/1050505898?referer=di&ht=edition]
+
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Villikins_and_his_Dinah
 +
 
 +
http://victorian.nuigalway.ie/modx/index.php?id=80
  
 
= The stage play by Burnand (1855)=  
 
= The stage play by Burnand (1855)=  
Line 49: Line 59:
  
 
Burnand's play was expressly written for Amateur performance, and first performed on November 8, 1855, at the A.D.C. Rooms, Cambridge. The text was published by [[T.H. Lacy]] in 1855(?).
 
Burnand's play was expressly written for Amateur performance, and first performed on November 8, 1855, at the A.D.C. Rooms, Cambridge. The text was published by [[T.H. Lacy]] in 1855(?).
 +
 +
For some reason [[F.C.L. Bosman]] (1980) lists the play as ''[[Vilikins and his Dinah]]''
  
 
==Translations and adaptations==
 
==Translations and adaptations==
Line 54: Line 66:
 
== Performance history in South Africa ==
 
== Performance history in South Africa ==
  
1865: Performed by the  [[Ray and Cooper Company]] in the [[Theatre Royal]], Cape Town, on 30 October, with Miriam's Crime (Craven).  
+
 
 +
1860: Performed as ''[[Vilikins and his Dinah]]'' (sic, and billed a "tragico-comico burlesque") by [[Charles Fraser]] in the [[Cabinet Theatre]], Cape Town, on 21 January, with ''[[A Hopeless Passion]]'' (Morton). The presentation "Under the Patronage of the Naval Forces in the Bay".
 +
 
 +
1860: Performed as ''[[Vilikins and his Dinah]]'' by [[Charles Fraser]] in the [[Cabinet Theatre]], Cape Town, on 26 January, with ''[[Slasher and Crasher]]'' ().
 +
 
 +
1860: Performed as ''[[Vilikins and his Dinah]]'' by [[Charles Fraser]] in the [[Cabinet Theatre]], Cape Town, on 7 February, with ''[[The Irish Tiger]]'' (Morton). The presentation "Under the Patronage of the Naval Forces in the Bay".
 +
 
 +
1865: Performed by the  [[Ray and Cooper Company]] in the [[Theatre Royal]], Cape Town, on 30 October, with ''[[Miriam's Crime]]'' (Craven).  
  
 
1867: Performed by the [[9th Regiment]] in the [[Theatre Royal]], Cape Town, on 25 May, with a "Gymnastic Display" and ''[[Mrs White]]'' (Raymond).
 
1867: Performed by the [[9th Regiment]] in the [[Theatre Royal]], Cape Town, on 25 May, with a "Gymnastic Display" and ''[[Mrs White]]'' (Raymond).
  
 
1867: Performed by the [[9th Regiment]] in the [[Theatre Royal]], Cape Town, on I June, with a "Gymnastic Display" and ''[[Jack's Delight]]'' (Williams).
 
1867: Performed by the [[9th Regiment]] in the [[Theatre Royal]], Cape Town, on I June, with a "Gymnastic Display" and ''[[Jack's Delight]]'' (Williams).
 +
 +
1869: Performed (though possibly the song version sung as a duet by Coock and Tanner), along with ''[[To Paris and Back for £5]]''  (Morton) by the [[Lanarkshire Dramatic Club]] (amateur players from the [[99th Regiment]]) in the [[Garrison Theatre]], Cape Town, on  17 June, part of the final performance and farewell by the Club.
  
 
== Sources ==
 
== Sources ==
  
[[F.C.L. Bosman]]. 1980. ''Drama en Toneel in Suid-Afrika, Deel II, 1856-1912''. Pretoria: [[J.L. van Schaik]]: pp.
+
[[F.C.L. Bosman]]. 1980. ''Drama en Toneel in Suid-Afrika, Deel II, 1856-1912''. Pretoria: [[J.L. van Schaik]]: pp. 126-7, 191-2, 259, 264
  
 
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Villikins_and_his_Dinah
 
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Villikins_and_his_Dinah

Latest revision as of 05:56, 12 July 2021

Villikins and his Dinah can refer to a popular stage song by an anonymous author, or to a burlesque play, using the song, by either J. Stirling Coyne or Francis C. Burnand.

(F.C.L. Bosman (1980) misspells the name as "Vilikins" in his history, though the error may have been made by his original sources.)

It is not always certain what form the performance took or which text was being used in a particular 19th century production. If it was not simply sung, Burnand's popular text often seems the most likely.

The stage song (1853)

The song

The song Villikins and his Dinah apparently emerged in England in 1853 as a burlesque version of a traditional ballad called "William and Dinah". Immensely popular, the well-known tune was later adopted for many other songs, including "Sweet Betsy from Pike".

(To listen to Kenneth McKellar's version of "Villikins and his Dinah" click on this link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WHjeDyv6Tzo )

Performance history in South Africa

1860: The Burnand burlesque version performed ("with songs") as afterpiece to A Hopeless Passion () by Charles Fraser and his company in the Cabinet Theatre, Cape Town, on 26 January.

1860: The Burnand burlesque version performed ("with songs") as afterpiece to Slasher and Crasher (Morton) by Charles Fraser and his company in the Cabinet Theatre, Cape Town, on 26 January

1861: The original stage song was apparently performed to acclaim by Private W. Dansie of the Ethiopian Serenaders, in the Garrison Theatre of either Grahamstown or Keiskama Hoek, as part of an evening of entertainment by the North Lincolnshire Regiment of Foot. , on May 27, 1861, and was repeated on the June 3. (See the entry on the North Lincolnshire Regiment of Foot for contemporaneous commentary on the performance.)

1869: Sung as a duet by Coock and Tanner (though it may possibly been a Performed version of Burnand's play), along with To Paris and Back for £5 (Morton) by the Lanarkshire Dramatic Club (amateur players from the 99th Regiment) in the Garrison Theatre, Cape Town, on 17 June, part of the final performance and farewell by the Club.

Sources

The North Lincoln Sphinx Vol 1, is a 300 page, bound volume, containing a collection of newsletters, mainly recording the social activities, of the 10th North Lincolnshire Regiment of Foot and was printed while the Regiment was stationed on the Eastern Frontier of the Cape Colony (now the Eastern Cape Province of the Republic of South Africa) between 1860 and 1862.

North Lincoln Sphinx Vol 1, No 7. June 13, 1861.

North Lincoln Sphinx Vol 1, No 8. September 30, 1861.

The stage play by Coyne (1854)

Willikind and hys Dinah is described as "[a]n original pathetic and heart-rending tragedy. In three sad scenes" by J. Stirling Coyne (1803-1868)[1].

The original text

First performed in Theatre Royal Haymarket on 16 March, 1854, and published in London by Thomas Hailes Lacy in 1854 as Volume 14 of Lacy's Acting Edition of Plays.

Translations and adaptations

Performance history in South Africa

Sources

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Villikins_and_his_Dinah

http://victorian.nuigalway.ie/modx/index.php?id=80

The stage play by Burnand (1855)

Villikins and his Dinah is a tragico-comico burlesque in one act by Francis C. Burnand (1836-1917)[2]

The original text

According to Wikipedia[3], Burnand's play was one of at least two farces written to exploit the popularity of the stage song Villikins and his Dinah (see above), which had emerged in England in 1853 as a burlesque version of a traditional ballad called "William and Dinah". Immensely popular, the tune was later adopted for many other songs, including "Sweet Betsy from Pike". The other farce based on the song is Willikind and hys Dinah (1854) by J. Stirling Coyne.

Burnand's play was expressly written for Amateur performance, and first performed on November 8, 1855, at the A.D.C. Rooms, Cambridge. The text was published by T.H. Lacy in 1855(?).

For some reason F.C.L. Bosman (1980) lists the play as Vilikins and his Dinah

Translations and adaptations

Performance history in South Africa

1860: Performed as Vilikins and his Dinah (sic, and billed a "tragico-comico burlesque") by Charles Fraser in the Cabinet Theatre, Cape Town, on 21 January, with A Hopeless Passion (Morton). The presentation "Under the Patronage of the Naval Forces in the Bay".

1860: Performed as Vilikins and his Dinah by Charles Fraser in the Cabinet Theatre, Cape Town, on 26 January, with Slasher and Crasher ().

1860: Performed as Vilikins and his Dinah by Charles Fraser in the Cabinet Theatre, Cape Town, on 7 February, with The Irish Tiger (Morton). The presentation "Under the Patronage of the Naval Forces in the Bay".

1865: Performed by the Ray and Cooper Company in the Theatre Royal, Cape Town, on 30 October, with Miriam's Crime (Craven).

1867: Performed by the 9th Regiment in the Theatre Royal, Cape Town, on 25 May, with a "Gymnastic Display" and Mrs White (Raymond).

1867: Performed by the 9th Regiment in the Theatre Royal, Cape Town, on I June, with a "Gymnastic Display" and Jack's Delight (Williams).

1869: Performed (though possibly the song version sung as a duet by Coock and Tanner), along with To Paris and Back for £5 (Morton) by the Lanarkshire Dramatic Club (amateur players from the 99th Regiment) in the Garrison Theatre, Cape Town, on 17 June, part of the final performance and farewell by the Club.

Sources

F.C.L. Bosman. 1980. Drama en Toneel in Suid-Afrika, Deel II, 1856-1912. Pretoria: J.L. van Schaik: pp. 126-7, 191-2, 259, 264

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Villikins_and_his_Dinah

Facsimile version of the original text by T.H. Lacy, HathiTrust Digital Library[4]

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