Difference between revisions of "Good for Nothing"

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''[[Good for Nothing]]''  is a comic drama in one act by J.B. Buckstone (1802-1879)[].  
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''[[Good for Nothing]]''  is a comic drama in one act by John Baldwin Buckstone (1802-1879)[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Baldwin_Buckstone].  
  
Also ''[[Nan]]'', ''[[Good for Nothing Nan]]'' or ''[[Nan, The Good for Nothing]]''  
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Apparently, on account of the central character of "Nan",  also known as ''[[Good for Nothing Nan]]'', ''[[Nan, The Good for Nothing]]'' or ''[[Nan the Good-For-Nothing]]'' in various parts of the world, though references here may on occasion actually be to popular vaudeville songs with these titles, rather than the play. 
  
 
==The original text==
 
==The original text==
  
 
First performed on 4 February 1851 in the Theatre Royal Haymarket, London.  
 
First performed on 4 February 1851 in the Theatre Royal Haymarket, London.  
Published in one volume with ''[[Domestic Economy]]'' (Lemon),  by J. Dicks in 1897.
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Published by W.V. Spencer, 1856 and in one volume with ''[[Domestic Economy]]'' (Lemon),  by J. Dicks in 1897.
  
 
==Translations and adaptations==
 
==Translations and adaptations==
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Inspired popular vaudeville songs by John T. Rutledge ("Good For Nothing Nan", 1877) and Thomas and George le Brun ("Good-for-nothing Nan",  written for and made popular by singer Vesta Victoria (1873-1951)[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vesta_Victoria], who admitted to basing her characterization of "Nan" on the play).
  
 
== Performance history in South Africa ==
 
== Performance history in South Africa ==
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Facsimile version of the 1897 edition by J. Dicks (No 1034 of ''Dick's Standard Plays''), [[The Internet Archive]][https://archive.org/details/domesticeconomyf00lemouoft/page/8]
 
Facsimile version of the 1897 edition by J. Dicks (No 1034 of ''Dick's Standard Plays''), [[The Internet Archive]][https://archive.org/details/domesticeconomyf00lemouoft/page/8]
  
[[F.C.L. Bosman]]. 1980. ''Drama en Toneel in Suid-Afrika, Deel II, 1856-1912''. Pretoria: [[J.L. van Schaik]]: pp.203-205
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[]
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Paul Fryer (Ed.). 2012. ''Women in the Arts in the Belle Epoque: Essays on Influential Artists''. McFarland:p. 193[https://books.google.co.za/books?id=GMJSkCux3PAC&pg=PA193&lpg=PA193&dq=Good-for-Nothing+Nan&source=bl&ots=C2tvzAm58a&sig=ACfU3U3Jgcv84MDQsI_Ld7ED-EukOQf29g&hl=en&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwioncehiYnkAhUQKVAKHXJOCnwQ6AEwC3oECAkQAQ#v=onepage&q=Good-for-Nothing%20Nan&f=false]
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[[F.C.L. Bosman]]. 1980. ''Drama en Toneel in Suid-Afrika, Deel II, 1856-1912''. Pretoria: [[J.L. van Schaik]]: pp.230,
  
 
Go to [[ESAT Bibliography]]
 
Go to [[ESAT Bibliography]]

Latest revision as of 06:54, 17 August 2019

Good for Nothing is a comic drama in one act by John Baldwin Buckstone (1802-1879)[1].

Apparently, on account of the central character of "Nan", also known as Good for Nothing Nan, Nan, The Good for Nothing or Nan the Good-For-Nothing in various parts of the world, though references here may on occasion actually be to popular vaudeville songs with these titles, rather than the play.

The original text

First performed on 4 February 1851 in the Theatre Royal Haymarket, London. Published by W.V. Spencer, 1856 and in one volume with Domestic Economy (Lemon), by J. Dicks in 1897.

Translations and adaptations

Inspired popular vaudeville songs by John T. Rutledge ("Good For Nothing Nan", 1877) and Thomas and George le Brun ("Good-for-nothing Nan", written for and made popular by singer Vesta Victoria (1873-1951)[2], who admitted to basing her characterization of "Nan" on the play).

Performance history in South Africa

1867: Performed as Good for Nothing by the Le Roy-Duret Company on 25 September as part of their "Grand Re-opening Night" in the Harrington Street Theatre, Cape Town, with The Swiss Cottage (Baily) and Delicate Ground (Dance).


Sources

Facsimile version of the 1897 edition by J. Dicks (No 1034 of Dick's Standard Plays), The Internet Archive[3]

[]

Paul Fryer (Ed.). 2012. Women in the Arts in the Belle Epoque: Essays on Influential Artists. McFarland:p. 193[4]

F.C.L. Bosman. 1980. Drama en Toneel in Suid-Afrika, Deel II, 1856-1912. Pretoria: J.L. van Schaik: pp.230,

Go to ESAT Bibliography

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